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Aussie actors lend their voice to Legacy’s ‘Letters of Gallipoli’ web series

To commemorate ANZAC Day, Legacy and GPY&R Melbourne and Finch have created ‘Letters of Gallipoli’, a seven-part webisode series.

Working with the Australian War Memorial, GPY&R researched the letters and diary entries written by Australians while they were aboard ships, fighting in the trenches and wounded in hospital beds.

The project uniquely documents the events as they happened over a century ago, through the very personal accounts of soldiers and nurses writing to their loved ones.

The letters are read by prominent Australian actors and personalities, including Vince Colosimo, Damon Herriman, Diana Glenn, John Howard, Gyton Grantley, Ita Buttrose and Josh Lawson.

One hundred years after they were written, the films will be released each day at lettersofgallipoli.com, in the lead up to Anzac Day.

Says James Wills, copywriter at GPY&R: “What’s wonderful is that some of Australia’s best talent and production crew have donated their time to help create this unique series for a great cause. What you see on film are actors reading these amazing letters for the first time. Included in the series is a diary entry from my own great-grandfather, so it’s a project I’m proud to have been part of.”

Time donated by cast and crew.

How to make a McWhopper and put your competition on notice.

This article first appeared in Mumbrella

At the recent CommsCon conference Josh Moore and Jono Key from Y&R New Zealand presented on the acclaimed McWhopper campaign for Burger King. This week the unlikely recipe was hailed at The Andys in New York, named Best in Show – a first for New Zealand.

What is a McWhopper – half McDonald’s Big Mac and half Burger King’s Whopper – actually worth?

About $182m in earned media and 8.9 billion media impressions, apparently.

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Y&R Staff across the globe build McWhoppers in a congratulatory nod to Y&R NZ

This article first appeared in Adweek

Y&R New Zealand’s celebrated McWhopper campaign took home the highest honor, the Grandy, at the 52nd annual International Andy Awards on Tuesday night. And Y&R staffers from around the globe celebrated in a fun (if not very healthy) way—by making their own handmade McWhoppers, as seen in the cute video below.

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An unprecedented double win for Y&R Group ANZ at the Andy Awards in NYC

This article first appeared in Campaign Brief

Y&R Group ANZ have become the first agency to scoop the two highest awards at the 52nd International ANDY Awards held in New York.

In an unprecedented double win, Y&R New Zealand has won Best in Show, affectionately known as the ‘GRANDY’, for Burger King’s ‘McWhopper‘, in the Corporate Responsibility category and GPY&R Australia has won the distinguished Richard T. O’Reilly Award for Outstanding Public Service, known as the ‘GRANDY FOR GOOD’ for Melanoma Patients Australia’s ‘Melanoma Likes Me‘ campaign which includes a $10,000 cash which will be given to the Melanoma Patients Australia charity.

It is the first time Y&R Group ANZ have won Best in Show at the ANDY Awards and the first time an ANZ-based group, or any network, has won both major prizes.

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What the Tesla Model 3 announcement teaches us about the importance of purpose and consistency, by GPY&R Senior Planner Alex Horner

This article first appeared in Marketing Mag

Alex Horner writes that Tesla’s launch of an affordable model electric car this week is the result of a decade of relentless pursuit of an unwavering brand purpose.

Almost a decade ago, Tesla’s enigmatic CEO, Elon Musk, wrote a blog post and published it on the Tesla website. Titled ‘The Secret Tesla Motors Master Plan’, it outlined a highly ambitious purpose for the then fledgling company:

“The overarching purpose of Tesla Motors is to help expedite the move from a mine-and-burn hydrocarbon economy towards a solar electric economy.”

As far as purposes go, Tesla’s was a great one: succinct, progressive and aspirational. There was no waffle. No superlatives. No use of the dreaded word ‘innovative’.

The post then takes things a step further with Musk offering a fairly detailed plan that outlines how he hopes to achieve his vision. Here’s the summary of that plan that he closes his post with:

  • “Build sports car,
  • use that money to build an affordable car,
  • use that money to build an even more affordable car, and
  • while doing above, also provide zero emission electric power generation options.”

With the launch of the $35,000 USD Model 3 this week, Musk can put a tick against each step of his plan. The original Roadster was the sports car. The Model S was the more affordable car. The Model 3 is the even more affordable car. And SolarCity (another Musk company) represents his strides towards zero-emission electric power generation options.

Think about that for a second. Consider just how much effort, focus and self-belief it takes to achieve an extraordinarily ambitious vision of this type. It’s not an exaggeration to suggest that many modern brands will have had ten separate purposes and plans within that time period, thanks to ten annual planning sessions in the past decade.

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SXSW Interactive: SOME LIVE OR DIE CHALLENGES FOR BIG RETAIL

Julian Bell, Managing Partner – GPY&R Melbourne

Retail is the $5-trillion driving force of the modern economy. Yet today’s SoLoMo shopping is almost unrecognisable from the salesman-to-buyer model of the last 2,000 years. With the pace of innovation only escalating – from personal robots and virtual reality – in 10 years, what will retail even look like?

I sat in to hear industry leaders explore how tech, culture and commerce will converge.

From a freewheeling discussion, here are 7 provocations that struck home:

  1. How well do you culturally evolve?

Could your business believe that we’ve reached the cultural tipping point of purchasing mattresses purely online? Casper did. Their sales were at $30 million last year and are expected to hit $100 million this year. Now more and more start –ups are joining the $15b pillow fight as legacy bedding retailers falter.

  1. What is your ongoing relevance?

You may have a wonderful heritage story but of what relevance is it today? How have you really adapted to changing customer behaviours? Be honest now…

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SXSW Interactive: Mobility on Demand

Julian Bell, Managing Partner – GPY&R Melbourne

From start-ups that solve complicated food decisions for the time poor to aggregated concierge services for Airb’n’b, the idea of ‘mobility on demand’ was a strong presence at this years’ conference.

To me, the pick of the bunch was a start-up named ‘Integrated Roadways’.

Consider first that 40% of U.S. roadways are in need of immediate repair, at an estimated cost of $2 trillion and growing… and you quickly understand it’s not a conversation government wants to have.

Combine this with the upcoming launch of the 5G networks and major Telco’s resistance to invest in cell tower infrastructure, and you now have the kernel of an inspired new business.

‘Integrated Roadways’ build precast Lego-style roadway blocks that contain embedded Telco technology and sensors…. facilitating a public + private partnership that drastically reduces cost to government, and eliminates the need for Telco tower investment (plus it makes for a smooth ride; currently used in German autobahns).

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SXSW Interactive: Autonomous Vehicles Driving a Better Society?

Julian Bell, Managing Partner – GPY&R Melbourne

Consider the fact that 90% of the 38,000 deaths on U.S. roads each year are caused by human error, and you quickly understand SXSW’s fascination with autonomous vehicles. I attended an expert panel discussion on the wide-ranging impacts of these vehicles: incredibly exciting for consumers, but highly concerning for peripheral industries.

So if we set aside a huge reduction in road trauma and its associated costs, what else should we expect?

Well, start by considering what consumers might do with $200 billion currently spent on automotive insurance… Volvo has recently committed to accept liability for any accidents in their autonomous vehicles, so confident are they in their product (quickly matched by most other major brands). What does this mean for the insurance category? Adapt quickly perhaps.

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